For Parents of Athletes


Below are some of the recommendations the "Sports Done Right" report makes for parents. The entire report is available here.

Do:

  • Give consistent encouragement and support to your children regardless of their success, skill level or time on the field.
  • Stress the importance of respect for coaches and teamwork.
  • Attend school meetings, meet coaches and school officials and learn first-hand about expectations for participation in school sports.
  • Serve as role models, see the "big picture" and support all programs and athletes.
  • Agree to abide by the school compact and rules guiding the conduct of sports.
  • Ensure a balance in student athletes' lives, encouraging participation in multiple sports and activities, with academics placed first and foremost.
  • Leave coaching to the coaches.
  • If your child wants to play NCAA college sports and receive a scholarship at the DI or DII level, your child will need to register and be cleared by the NCAA. The Eligibility Center is the organization within the NCAA that determines the academic eligibility and amateur status for all NCAA DI and DII athletes. The first step in registering for the NCAA Eligibility Center is to create an account.It is best to create an account by the start of the junior year in high school to avoid getting caught in the backlog of athletes trying to get cleared at the end of the year. Once an account is created there will be several more steps to submit transcripts, test scores and answer the amateur status questionnaire before the process is completed. For more information about the NCAA Eligibility Center go here: http://www.athleticscholarships.net/ncaa-clearinghouse.htm

Don't:

  • Pressure student athletes to perform at unrealistic levels.
  • Display disrespect toward coaches, officials and opposing teams.
  • Encourage early specialization in a single sport.
  • Stress playing time or position played by your child over the success of the team.
  • Be a sideline coach, intervening and talking to your child during games or practice.